What a difference; empowered, settled and happy in school

An example of how using a one-page profile from an early age has helped Lucy express what she needs and positively influence the support she receives.  Lucy’s one-page profile has followed her through school from the age of eight and at age thirteen, it’s hard to imagine how things would have turned out without it.

Lucy's one-page profile

Lucy’s one-page profile

Written by Gill Goodwin of HSA

Lucy was placed for adoption aged two after moving to foster care just before her first birthday due to extreme neglect. Now thirteen, Lucy has settled well however the legacy of her difficult start means she can become very anxious, has some difficulties with learning and some sensory problems. Lucy has a statement of educational need and receives full time support in her local mainstream school.

Since being eight years old Lucy has had a one-page profile. At the time she was experiencing symptoms of anxiety and we had hoped that a profile would enable her to be happier and more relaxed in school and optimise her relationships and learning.I visited Lucy and her Mum at home and we talked about what made a good day for Lucy and the kind of things Lucy felt would make a difference for her. I then spent some time with her class teacher and teaching assistant in school. Putting together the profile with Lucy’s mum meant that we were able to double check that it fully reflected Lucy from her perspective and covered all the important information that people needed to know to support her well.

Almost immediately after introducing Lucy’s first one-page profile her level of anxiety reduced and in turn some of her repetitive behaviours such as adjusting her clothes and pulling up her socks. It also had a positive effect on her skills such as reading aloud and her motivation to try activities in school.

Each year we update her profile in preparation for the school year ahead. Now that Lucy is in secondary school her Special Needs Coordinator goes through the one-page profile with her Teachers and Teaching Assistants at a meeting before the year starts. She ensures all staff have a copy and that the TAs in particular know the best ways to support Lucy and enable her to have good days.  Little things like teachers smiling at her specifically when she enters the room make her feel more relaxed.  Lucy’s one-page profile means that staff are aware of the things that can make Lucy upset and ensure that situations do not escalate and that she is supported to stay calm.

As she has matured Lucy has been able to identify the kind of support she knows will help her and is confident to tell her learning coach and SENCo. For example at her annual review she was able to say why she found the support from one TA less helpful and could explain that she needed her to give information one step at a time and not give the next instruction while she was writing or thinking. Having the one-page profile, and it so clearly belonging to her, has meant Lucy seems to understand that it is her responsibility to let people know how to support her in the best way. She also knows the way to phrase things and is therefore becoming empowered to influence positively the support she is given.

School staff  in her new school have quickly got to know Lucy and what makes her tick and these close supportive relationships have been pivotal in her successful inclusion into a large mainstream comprehensive school.

Lucy has had a one-page profile for so long now that it is difficult to know how things would have been without one! Lucy is happy, settled and has all the opportunities at school and at home open to her, which is what she and her family had wished for.

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5 top tips for using one-page profiles in divorce

Sue Atkins

Sue Atkins

Written by Sue Atkins

I am a Parenting Expert, Writer, Speaker, Broadcaster, Parenting Coach and a mum! I’ve used one-page profiles in my work for many years and with my own family and can’t rave enough about their usefulness for improving communication, relationships, a child’s self esteem and self confidence

More recently I have been using one-page profiles to help children and families going through the often challenging and traumatic experience of a divorce as well as working with children whose parents have separated, experiencing  all of the changes that this can bring; from living in two different homes,  splitting their time between mum and dad, moving schools, to experiencing lots of changing routines,

This is a subject very close to my heart as more than a year ago my ex husband and I started divorce proceedings.  I discovered via Facebook that he was having an inappropriate relationship with another woman which came as quite a shock!  We had been married for 21 years and had brought up  two wonderful children and shared a full life together.  But as  I tell my clients,  divorce is a process not an event and over time you begin to see the opportunities that change can open up for you.

My children are grown up now but many of the parents that I work with have younger children and they come to me because they understand that divorce is life changing and that whilst the adults are making the decisions the children can be left feeling like everything that they knew is different, leading to feelings of powerlessness, insecurity and isolation. By using one-page profiles with families going through divorce we are able to uncover what is working and not working from the child’s perspective, what is important to them and for them and what support they need during this time. It puts the child at the centre of the decision making and brings back the focus to them so that their voices are heard above the noise of a relationship break-up.

I use one-page profiles with parents too before we sit down with the children.  Supporting mum or dad to feel empowered and in control is critical to their wellbeing and therefore their ability to support their children through divorce. The more I work with families and see the results that one-page profiles can have, the more I would like to see them being used more frequently with children whose parents are getting divorce. Perhaps it is a service that divorce solicitors could offer to their clients to help their children process this life changing event? What if all schools used them and were able to help a child communicate their feelings through their profile when things are difficult at home? I often think about how we can get this resource out there to as many people as possible so that they too can experience its benefits and feel happier and better supported because of it.

I know first-hand that one-page profiles can be invaluable to keeping communication flowing and reminding us all about what is important and to whom during divorce and I’m just glad that more people are going to hear about them through this blog. Here are, in my opinion,  the top 5 benefits for using one-page profiles in divorce:

  1. It puts the child at the centre of the divorce, ahead of the emotions of the parents, ahead of any disagreements and firmly at the heart of all decision making.
  2. It can make a child feel listened to at a time when their voice could be lost amidst the noise, drama and pain of a relationship break-up.
  3. It helps parents gain clarity; direction and confidence about what mum and dad need to do to support their child in the way they want to feel supported through all the changes.
  4. It gives children and parents who use one-page profiles a sense of choice and control at a time of extreme change.
  5. Because of the way a one-page profile is structured , the information is so simple, quick and easy to digest it can be shown to school, other family members and friends so that people outside of the immediate family can contribute to supporting the child during the divorce process.

Sue Atkins is a spokesperson for one-page profiles because she believes in their value and would like to see more people learn about and be able to use the tool in their own life. If you would like to learn more about Sue Atkins and the work she does with families please visit her website.

The cornerstone of being a person-centred organisation

An example of how one-page profiles have improved communication, daily interactions and strengthened relationships in this working environment. Tony Pearson describes one-page profiles as the cornerstone of being a person-centred organisation.

TonyWritten by Tony Pearson

Following a 20 year career in the public sector, in which I was a manager in both the NHS and in Local Government, I joined Real Life Options in November 2009. I am a member of the Institute of Healthcare Management (IHM) and of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD).

As the Director of Human Resources and acting Director of Operations, making sure that colleagues feel valued and part of the wider organisation is an area of upmost importance. Recognising people as individuals, acknowledging their skills and strengths and supporting any areas for development are key to an engaged workforce. If our staff are happy, they will provide support to the best of their abilities. One-page profiles are a really good way to demonstrate person-centred values.

I gave my one-page profile a great deal of consideration before getting anything down on paper. At first it can feel slightly alien to be considering your strengths and the best ways in which others can support you. As a Director it has been a great opportunity to let others in on details that might seem insignificant but are actually quite important, for example my preference for face to face contact over emails or telephone conversations, and that it’s ok and actually appreciated when people remind me of deadlines. The section that addresses what people like and admire about me was gathered during an exercise in a Head Office meeting where we all worked together to develop our first one-page profiles.

My profile is displayed on the wall at all the regional offices, so that colleagues from all parts of the organisation can familiarise themselves with what I am about. I use mine to send out to people prior to a meeting, this is especially useful in situations where we may be meeting for the first time – It always gets a positive response.

Having a one-page profile has made a substantial difference in my every day interactions. It stands to reason that if you communicate what is important to you, who you are and what support you need that interaction becomes easier, and relationships are improved and strengthened. It is also good to have an opportunity to let people in to a little about your personal life. I mention my family on my one-page profile as they are very important to me.

On an organisation-wide scale as well as personally, one-page profiles have influenced the way in which people interact and communicate with each other.  It’s the cornerstone of being a person-centred organisation as you need to know these kind of details about others from the outset in order to be able to be supportive and treat people as individuals, respecting their needs and viewpoint.

Breaking down preconceived ideas

An example of how one-page profiles can be used to introduce the person rather than the diagnoses.  Alfie’s dad talks about how his son’s profile has helped people get to know him and all of his positive traits rather than just his diagnoses of Aspergers.

Alfie's one-page profile

Alfie’s one-page profile

Written by Damien Nolan, Alfie’s dad

Alfie is our ten year old son who has had a formal diagnoses of Aspergers Syndrome since he was three years old. Alfie is a great boy with a big heart and loving demeanor.  He is very cuddly in an innocent kind of way. His friends and family are incredibly important to him and he is obsessive with all things transport related.

I decided to help Alfie produce a one-page profile after attending a person-centred approaches course run by Yvonne Linton, Family Footings Facilitator.  I thought it would come in very useful to show to teachers, doctors and people new to Alfie, so that they could gain a quick understanding of who he really is as opposed to seeing him only for his diagnoses.

Alfie and I talked through his one-page profile. I wanted him to be happy with the picture that his one-page profile would paint and for him to feel that I had got his traits and passions correct. He also chose the photos to be included which he really enjoyed.

Since making the profile we have used it at every opportunity. It has been particularly useful at school when meeting with new teachers or teaching assistants that might not have worked with Alfie before. Alfie likes to be included in class and gets upset if he feels left out. He needs a lot of encouragement at PE and he needs to know well in advance if there will be a change to his timetable. As well as communicating this vital information, Alfie’s profile has helped his new teachers get a good feel of who Alfie really is (all his lovely traits) and be at ease in terms of how to support and interact with him.

Has having the one-page profile made a difference? Well I like to think so. It’s nice to involve Alfie in how the world will see him and hopefully break down some preconceived ideas that people might have about a boy with a diagnoses of Aspergers.

Most recently I used the one-page profile at a Transition meeting with a SENCo from Alfie’s new secondary school which he starts in September. I don’t think she had seen one before and she took it away with her which was great. Especially as it was the first time she had met Alfie and it gave her some points to talk to him about, ensuring they got off to a good start. Once Alfie starts secondary school I will make sure that all his new teachers take a copy.

My hope is that by using the one-page profile more and more, the people who come into contact with Alfie will quickly get to know the ‘boy’ rather than the ‘label’ of Aspergers.

You can find more examples of using one-page profiles and other person-centred thinking tools in a school setting from this website www.personalisingeducation.org

Living with dementia – Shirley loves to feel the rain on her face

A powerful example of how a one-page profile can empower people living with dementia to direct their own support. Shirley is now supported in a way that makes sense to her thanks to the deeper understanding people have about what is important to and for her.

Shirley's one-page profile

Shirley’s one-page profile

Written by Narindra Devi and Gill Bailey

Shirley is 78 years old and a retired accountant living in Wolverhampton.  For the last five years Shirley has lived in a residential service supporting people living with dementia. Described as a strong character who is always kind and considerate, Shirley is very active and can rarely be found sitting down but prefers to be on the go, walking around and chatting to others.

As someone who has worked with numbers her whole life it isn’t surprising that Shirley still talks about and quotes numbers to people regularly. This is something that the staff who know Shirley well understand and are able to respond to. In the same way, the support staff who know Shirley well realise how important it is to enable her to freely move around and how she doesn’t like to sit still. Recently it became apparent that some staff didn’t know these important details about Shirley. She was being asked to sit down more which was causing her to be distressed and she was also getting upset when her support team didn’t converse with her about numbers and statistics; something that she loved to do.

Meeting together, the staff team realised that only a few of them knew what worked for Shirley and that they needed to find a way of sharing this information more widely so that everyone could support Shirley well. To do this they used a one-page profile. Together the team talked about all the things that were important to Shirley and what best support looked like. They shared what they like and admire about Shirley and these appreciations were all captured on her one-page profile.

The profile communicates vital information about how to support Shirley well. All staff must be aware never to try and make Shirley sit down as this would lead to her becoming very distressed and could lead to her harming herself or others. They also learnt that when giving Shirley medication they should wait for her to pass and never chase after her as this would create great distress and anxiety for Shirley. Another rich insight that is shared on Shirley’s profile is her dislike of people touching or talking about her feet. Making staff aware of this means they can avoid upsetting Shirley unintentionally.

Shirley now has more control over how she lives because the people who support her understand what is important to her. She now goes for walks outdoors as much as possible. Previously staff would have shied away from supporting her outside if it was raining but they now understand how important this time is for her and acknowledge that going out for a short time in a little rain won’t cause Shirley any harm and actually she appears to love to feel the rain on her face if her huge smile is anything to go by!!

Even new staff can get to know Shirley well and quickly by looking at her one-page profile.

Shirley is much more relaxed and content since developing her one-page profile. It is my belief that if we are to truly personalise support for people living with dementia, we have to support a way of living which makes sense to the person as well as ensuring they stay healthy, safe and well. This has been achieved for Shirley.

For more details on Gill Bailey and Helen Sanderson’s book; Personalisation and Dementia please visit Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

Bridging the gap between home and school

An excellent example of how one-page profiles in schools can help pupils and teachers adjust to a new term, build confidence, enhance understanding and communicate additional support needs. Jacob had struggled to make progress with his writing and to engage in certain lessons. His one-page profile has helped him turn this around, with his writing improving significantly and a better consistency in support between home and school.

Jacob's one-page profile

Jacob’s one-page profile

Written by Jacob’s mum Marianne 

My son Jacob is nine years old. He lives at home with me, his dad and his two younger brothers. Jacob loves playing computer games and watching films.

Jacob doesn’t get any formal additional support at school but has been struggling for a couple of years to make progress with his writing. He enjoys being in class but can find it difficult to concentrate when the subject matter doesn’t grab his attention.

Jacob’s youngest brother has had a one-page profile for quite a while and so during the summer holidays before starting Year 5, Jacob and I decided we would develop one for him too. We hoped it would help his new teacher get to know him quickly.

We asked Jacob’s teachers who already knew him well to tell us what they had learnt about him over the last year. We asked them to focus in particular on the things they liked about him as well as the support he needs to get the most out of learning.

We also asked the rest of our family what they love about him. Jacob spent time thinking about the things he most enjoyed about being at school – the things that meant he had a great day there.

Jacob loves playing on his dad’s ipad and decided he wanted to use an app called pic collage to develop what his profile looked like. This meant he could design it as he wanted to.

Jacob took his one-page profile back to school with him after the summer holidays and gave it to his new teacher. A copy was also given to his Kumon teacher which he started at the same time.

The profile is kept on our fridge at home so everyone can see it. His dad and I use the ‘important for’ section in particular when helping him with his homework.

The plan is to update it properly, once a year. As the summer term comes to an end, we will ask his Year 5 teachers to share their learning about how best to support Jacob at school in preparation for helping year 6 get off to the best start.

Jacob is already working out how his next profile will look – he’s decided that the wrestling and superheroes photos will most likely be replaced with Skylanders!

Jacob really enjoyed creating his own profile. He said that he liked having a photo that wasn’t of him wearing his school uniform and he liked being able to find photos of the things he likes to put on it.

When his profile was given to his Kumon teacher, she said it was one of the most useful things she had seen in terms of understanding Jacobs learning support needs straight away.

His school teacher was new to the whole school not just Jacob, so his profile helped her quickly get a feel for what mattered to Jacob, how to get him and keep him interested in learning.

We absolutely loved hearing from his year 4 teachers what they liked about him as did Jacob! It was so good to hear the genuine affection and regard they had for him and to hear how different he is at school from at home. We also found the information about how to support him at school really helpful and detailed. We hadn’t been given this information previously and it made a real difference to how we now support Jacob at home with school work.

Jacob has made much progress in his first two terms of year 5. The school has a better understanding of how to engage in what he is learning and his concentration has therefore improved. He has made more progress in his writing this year than he has in the previous three years and there is more consistency between home and school in how we all support him. I’m looking forward to repeating the process each year and seeing how Jacob and his one-page profiles evolve.

You can find more examples of using one-page profiles and other person-centred thinking tools in a school setting from this website www.personalisingeducation.org

Triggering happy memories

A powerful example of how a one-page profile can draw out the important information needed to support someone with dementia to re-connect with their past and feel happy and safe in their surroundings.

TobyWritten by Tracey & Rose from Merry Hill House

Eighty-seven year old Toby was born and bred in Wolverhampton. Described as a real gentleman, Toby’s wife sadly passed away five years ago. His son Sean is his main carer as Toby is now in the advanced stages of dementia. Sean says Toby was a hands-on husband and father and his family was always his priority. Toby has an infectious smile and personality to match, he has always had strong work ethics and Sean can’t remember his dad ever having a day off. He recalls fondly that Toby would often say; “the harder you work and save for something, the more you’ll appreciate it.”  Throughout his life Toby has liked things to be ‘in place’ and would always look immaculate.

Toby came every six weeks for a three night respite stay here at Merry Hill House. During his stays he would go around the unit collecting other people’s shoes and lining them up in his room. He’d also be fascinated with the electrical sockets and get quite agitated when staff tried to move him away for his safety.

A staff member sat with Toby and his son to discuss one-page profiles and how through discussions we could find a solution to help Toby feel happier, safer and more independent in his environment. Toby was present but unable to contribute a great deal verbally due to his dementia which meant that his son Sean was the one that provided the rich insight into Toby’s life.  It became clear very quickly that Toby led a full and active life, working and spending quality time with family. For many years he was an electrician and in his spare time he would take his son to a unit he owned where they built a barge together.

As a group, staff were asked to think about how we could use the information gleaned from his one-page profile to reduce the risk and to increase Toby’s wellbeing, giving him back the feeling of control in his day to day life.  We wanted to help Toby re-connect with his past and for him to feel busy as this is what he was used to. Together the team and Sean made a list of some of the items that would help Toby. Sean was to pack extra pairs of shoes when Toby came to stay and we were to provide shoe polish and a blacking brush so that he could polish shoes just like he did for his family as a child on a Sunday afternoon. We also filled a box with electrical items like plugs, light switches and a flex. Whenever Toby started touching the sockets or gathering shoes we were able to lead him to his boxes and he was happy again.

We have noticed a great difference in Toby’s wellbeing as has Sean who now uses the boxes at home too. Toby will spend many an hour polishing shoes until they are pristine, he will also sit with a small screw driver taking the plugs apart and connecting flex to them. We learnt this important information from Toby’s one-page profile and we are now able to support him to do the things that trigger his happiest memories; a wonderful outcome from having a good conversation and recording the important information on just one page.

Using profiles professionally with colleagues and families

An example of how one-page profiles can assist people professionally. Chris talks about how his profile has improved communication and understanding with colleagues, managers and the families he works with.

Chris' one-page profile

Chris’ one-page profile

Written by Chris

I am a Facilitator with MacIntyre’s Family Footings programme.  I support families to learn new ways to make their voices heard and exercise greater choice and control over the care and support they receive. I use my one-page profile as a way of introducing myself to new people.

I originally created my one-page profile when I was applying for my job. I was asked to bring one along with me to interview. By writing it, I felt like I could give my interviewers an idea of who I really am – not just the qualities I have that I would normally talk about on an application form, but information about my other interests and a bit about challenges in my life too. I wrote the text for the profile myself and showed it to my wife and my parents afterwards, asking for their feedback. Since then I have made a lot of little changes to my profile to keep it relevant. For instance, I have amended the bit about my running as my weekly training mileage has increased. I added the bit about supporting individual families when brokerage started to become a bigger part of my role at work.

I use my one-page profile a lot at work. I often bring copies with me to workshops I lead for parents and professionals in order to introduce the tool to them in a way that will support them to use it reflectively before immediately applying it to children they support. I give copies of it to families that I work with on an individual basis to help them see a less formal side of me straight away. I have also written another, less personal version of my profile that I can use to introduce myself in circumstances where I need to showcase my professional skills and attributes, as I realise that my personal one-page profile isn’t appropriate for every situation.

Parents and carers with whom I share my one-page profile frequently tell me how refreshing it is to have a more holistic look at who someone coming to their house to support them actually is. It’s a good way for me to introduce the tool to them too because reading my profile often causes them to get excited about the potential benefits it could have for members of their own family. When I have had chance meetings with people who have attended my workshops in the past and have seen my one-page profile, I am often surprised when they ask about my running or songwriting. Because we have shared things with each other about what is important to us, we have a better starting place for forming relationships that are based on mutual respect and understanding.

My one-page profile has also allowed me to have better relationships with my colleagues and manager. Because we all created and shared our profiles when we started in post, we all started our work with an appreciation of each other’s strengths and information about how best to work together. For instance, my co-workers know from my one-page profile that I prefer to receive information electronically, and I know that some of them prefer to receive information on paper or in conversation. We have also taken time during team meetings to revisit the ‘Like and Admire’ sections of our profiles and add things to each other’s. This has helped build our working relationships with each other and has helped me to gain extra confidence in certain areas of my practice because of how my colleagues see me.

Revolutionising the way we teach

One-page profiles are used with every pupil in this school so that teachers can personalise the education and support that they give. Capturing the individual information about each child in this way has changed the way they teach and share information. This is Sion’s story.

Sion's one-page profile

Sion’s one-page profile

Written by Teacher, Carys Bird

Sion is 14 years old, born one of twins, he is on the autistic spectrum and has no verbal language but makes his needs known by making noises and reaching for items. Sion has severe learning disabilities, and attends a Special Needs School.

As a school we took the approach that each pupil would have a one-page profile and a person-centred review.  Sion’s profile was developed as part of that piece of work.  We wanted to take a person-centred approach to education to ensure that we supported each pupil as an individual and to make sure that others had positive and useful information about each child as they came into school as visitors or professionals.

Sion’s one-page profile was developed by classroom staff, as well as others who know him well.  It has been added to and changed over the years as Sion has grown and developed.  We use the person-centred review process annually and this gives us the opportunity to formally update Sion’s profile with his parents and other professionals who support him.

Sion’s one-page profile can be accessed quickly from a file in the classroom enabling people to identify Sion, and to be immediately aware of how best to support him, as well as giving them a positive description and information which helps them to engage with Sion.  As he enters ‘transition’ it will be used to inform the development of his Transition Plan.

Using one-page profiles throughout our school has made understanding the needs of pupils at each level much easier.  For Sion, it has taken the guesswork out of getting to know and understand him, especially for new staff coming into school, and professionals who are starting to work with him through transition, such as his careers adviser.

Other people knowing how to interact and engage with Sion has led to him feeling more comfortable with staff and has reduced his anxieties when around new people. This has resulted in him having more positive connections with others and he will now sit alongside his fellow pupils in class of his own accord.

As all staff understand the importance of consistency in supporting Sion, he is now able to have more social opportunities out and about as part of his school day.  Staff no longer have to delve into huge files to find the information, which is not clear and concise, in order to support Sion well . His one-page profile holds all the vital information and positively presents Sion, making it easier for people to support him in what he wants to do and build a relationship with him based on a deeper understanding.

To learn more about personalising education visit www.personalisingeducation.org

Teamwork – staying true to what we’ve stated as important

An excellent example of how a team one-page profile can help people work collaboratively.  There are five core people supporting Jennie day-to-day; by having one profile they can easily represent themselves and what is important, to new and existing people in Jennie’s life and in particular to her Circle of Support.

Jennie's Team one-page profile

Jennie’s Team one-page profile

Written by Zoe Robinson

We work as a team for Independent Options to support Jennie to be safe and well whilst trying out new things, have positive life experiences and to personally develop. Jennie is a bright independent young woman with learning disabilities and autism.

Jennie moved into her flat three years ago which is why it is so important that we as a team are matched well with her and each other as we work in her home. Having produced our own one-page profiles and supported Jennie to produce hers, we decided it was important to have a team profile too. There are five of us that work closely as Jennie’s core team. We needed to document and record what was important to us and for us because these are the things that we had come to learn were important to Jennie’s happiness and safety too. By having a team profile we hoped it would help us work better together, appreciate each other’s contributions and individual personalities. We also wanted a way of communicating what we were striving for collectively – to represent our outlook so that as the team evolved we could be consistent in our support of Jennie.

We each wrote our own one-page profiles, asking each other what we like and admire about each of us and recording what was important to and for us as individuals. We then used this information to create a team one-page profile. Not only did this process help us get to know each other better but we were also able to share it with other services within Independent Options and with Jennie’s Circle of Support to improve their understanding about who we are and what we stand for. For Jennie, it gave her one sheet of paper with the photographs and statements of the people who support her; something which she is very proud of.

The most rewarding part of producing a team one-page profile has been the way it has helped us to work together. On it we have stated the things that are important, such as always listening to each other, respecting each other and being consistent in the way we support Jennie. Having this recorded keeps us on track and focused in our roles. We have also communicated how other people from outside the team can support us by providing good supervision and clear communication, again making it easier for people outside of the team to work with us collaboratively.

When new people join the team they produce their own one-page profile and are added to the teams. This helps reduce all the awkward questions that people can be faced with when first working together.  It means that we don’t have to try to work each other out as we have all the important information on one sheet of paper. Just like the team profile, our individual profiles change and develop with us and with Jennie. Revisiting them is an excellent way of reviewing what is working and what isn’t. Are we respecting what we have each stated as important? Are we supporting each other to do the best job we can do? And crucially – are we being true to our purpose and keeping Jennie at the heart of everything we do? This is a question we as a team ask ourselves regularly, it is what makes us strong and our profile empowers us to make it happen.

Jennie’s mum Suzie has been sharing blogs this week about Jennie’s Circle of Support and its role in her journey to independent living. You can read more about this here.