One-page profiles for support and recovery

A practical example of how this team approached creating a one-page profile for Charlie following his second stroke.

Charlie's one-page profile

Charlie’s one-page profile

Charlie is a warm, friendly and kind guy. He is a family man, who is very determined to regain as much of his independence as possible after having his second stroke seven months ago. He has a ready smile, enjoys a joke and has a good sense of humour. He is a mechanic by profession.

Charlie has had two strokes as a result of having Lupus and has been attending Action for Independence for the last six months to regain his confidence, skills and mobility, after being referred by the Physical Disability Team. The team at Action for Independence wanted to make sure that they were focusing their support on the issues that mattered most to Charlie and so decided to produce a one-page profile with him.

Action for Independence is looking at how we can use Person Centred Thinking to help focus on what matters to people. This will help us as a team, to identify what support we can offer to help a person maintain, change, or move towards a lifestyle that now makes sense to them.  We wanted Charlie’s one-page profile to help us to have a conversation about the next steps to support his recovery.

To get started on this, one of the team members went back through the original referral that was made to the service and pulled out any information that told us about what is important to Charlie and what others need to know or do to best support him. She also wrote down a list of questions to be figured out from what she was reading. After this she took some coloured highlighter pens and went through the pages of on-going diary notes that had been recorded by the whole team about his progress and involvement in the service over the past months.  Coloured highlighters were used to illuminate anything she noticed about ‘what we like and admire’ about Charlie and what was ’important to him’.

The team member explained to Charlie what she was doing and why she wanted to take this approach to learn about him and support him well.  She did this over a cup of tea and she shared her own one-page profile with him so he could see how it worked. They talked for about 20 minutes, initially focusing the conversation on what made a good day and what made a bad day for Charlie both at the centre and at home.  They then looked at the appreciations section of the one-page profile and talked about what others liked and admired about Charlie.

At the end-of-day handover meeting for the team, the team member posted up flip chart sheets on the wall with the headings pre-written on them – ‘ Like and admire’, ‘Important to’, ‘How best to support’ and ‘Questions to answer’. She invited the team to grab a marker pen and for the next 10 minutes to write up all of the new things they had discovered about Charlie. She then shared what she had learnt from the notes and her conversation with him.  There was a strong level of agreement.

The team took note of the questions to answer and decided on which ones they could start to work on immediately.  Charlie’s one-page profile was written up using all this rich information to clearly communicate the essential information that everyone needed to know on one single sheet of paper.

After several weeks Charlie decided to reduce his days of attendance at Action for Independence to once weekly. He has been very successful in achieving his goals more independently and is ready to take his next steps. The team have been able to support him in this based on their rich insight into what is important to him and what good support looks like.

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Capturing the past, present and future in a one-page profile

A powerful example of how a one-page profile has helped this man reconnect with his passions, improve his relationships and his communication. Ray’s family had become concerned about his health and wellbeing and after he was admitted to hospital, they asked for help to support him well.

Ray's one-page profile

Ray’s one-page profile

Written by Gill Bailey

Eighty year old Ray is full of life and enjoys the company of others. He is a jovial character and loves telling stories about his life experiences. Ray has lived in his first floor flat in Burnley for about 41 years.

When Ray was younger, he had lots of jobs such as working on the railways as a signal man and a train driver. Ray went into the Army for a time with the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment and travelled all over the world. He went to Normandy and takes great pride in this.

Ray has always been a very active and sociable man. He has lots of hobbies like collecting books, reading, music of all types and going to the Miners Club where his friend Harry used to take him every third Wednesday to meet up with all the ex-soldiers. They would have a few drinks and then Harry used to bring him home.

Over the last few years however it has become apparent that Ray has not been managing as well as he used to do at home. People were not visiting him as regularly and his home was becoming difficult to move around because he had taken to collecting and storing boxes of papers, books and magazines.

He was beginning to become socially isolated and wasn’t going out as often as he used to. He was not taking care of himself and his health was deteriorating both physically and mentally.

Ray’s family and friends became concerned that he wasn’t coping well, and needed some help to “get him back on his feet.” It was when Ray was admitted to Hospital due to poor mobility, confusion and water retention that a home person-centred review was arranged.  Ray, his son and daughter-in-law, his best friend Harry and support staff were all involved in the review. The aim was to bring together those people who knew Ray best and who could help him get his life back on track.

By developing a one-page profile we were able to capture the things that are important to Ray and more of the things that matter to him and that he wants to be in his life. This has helped in creating activities for Ray and plans to make his life better and more enjoyable and worth while.

It has given his family, friends and those close to him some ideas and plans on how to best support Ray and to identify the things that worked well for him.

During the review lots of very rich nuggets of information about what people knew about Ray and what mattered to him came to light. His past, present and his future were also discussed

Big changes have resulted from the review and the one-page profile. We recognised the need to do more work using communications charts and relationships maps to help Ray in these areas. We also identified the problems he was having in his home, keeping on top of cooking and cleaning and how his difficulty getting out had left him feeling lonely.

Ray has since moved into a sheltered housing scheme in Burnley. There are activities daily in the complex that Ray can get involved in and they have a book club in which they are looking at appointing a new member for the committee. They also have a local cookery class that is being run by the Volunteer Services who collect the group twice weekly and they go to the local community centre and regain confidence, motivation and skills in and around the kitchen so Ray can go back to his own flat in the complex and prepare meals for himself.

The complex provides lunch and evening meals daily, so Ray gets to go and mix with others and tell them his stories. Ray has a key worker who has been matched to him using his one-page profile and they have started visiting the Miners Club again every third Thursday and Harry meets them there for a drink.

Ray is much more relaxed, less frustrated and his life now has more meaning and purpose. He feels valued and he now offers others support. Ray is much more settled and appears happier in himself, smiling. laughing and joking with his new and old friends.

 

 

 

Managing a long term health condition

An example of how a person introduced to one-page profiles in a professional capacity used the approach in their personal life to help manage a long-term health condition.

Jo Greenbank's one-page profile

Jo Greenbank’s one-page profile

Written By Dimensions

Jo is 36 year’s old. She was diagnosed with endometriosis five years ago. There is no cure for endometriosis, but Jo has had a number of surgical and medical treatments to try and manage the condition. In 2011, Jo started working for Dimensions, a person-centred organisation who supports people with learning disabilities and autism, and who use person-centred thinking in all areas of their work.

Jo has been using the person-centred thinking tools as part of her role, but has also come to realise that they can be applied to her personal life and in particular her health. As well as producing a one-page profile for work purposes, Jo decided to create one in relation to her endometriosis  with the aim of assisting her to reflect on what’s important to her when managing the condition, and how others can support her well.

Jo developed her profile by talking with friends and family and thinking carefully about how the condition makes her feel, and what she wants the people around her to know.

Jo has used the one-page profile with doctors, so that they understand what is important to her, especially the need to see beyond the label of the condition.  She has also used it with other people in her life who support her. Often, when in pain, it can be difficult to see things clearly and with perspective, therefore preparing for this at a time when the condition is under control has been helpful. It has given Jo the time and space to think about what really matters.

The one-page profile has empowered Jo to think about getting the balance right between what is important to her and what she needs in terms of support to stay fit and healthy. She will continue to update it and plans to use it in preparation for seeing new doctors throughout the next stage of her treatment.

You can find out about other person-centred thinking tools to help you manage long term health conditions from thinkaboutyourlife.org.

The youngest person yet to use a one-page profile!

The youngest person yet to use a one-page profile. Baby James was just three days old when his mum created his profile to help hospital staff understand how best to support them both.

James' one-page profile

James’ one-page profile

Written by mum Deb

James arrived a day after his due date, after around 16 hours of labour.  The cord was around his neck, he was in a difficult position, and so we were advised that we needed a vacuum delivery. He was born just before 8pm under a blue moon.  He was the most beautiful purplish slippery floppy thing that I had ever seen.  After a brief cuddle, he was whisked away to the special care nursery to await a visit from the pediatrician.  My friend and student midwife persisted with staff until they returned my baby to me, looking a healthier shade of pink and gazing endlessly at me with his deep dark blue eyes.

Aside from a bruised and swollen head, he was deemed healthy and okay to see the doctor in the morning.  The nurses decided that I was too fatigued to responsibly look after my baby that night, so he was taken back to the special nursery and I spent a sleepless night euphoric, yet pining for my baby boy. My first night as a mother held the strangest combination of immeasurable joy and a complete sense of powerlessness.  I knew my baby and I would both be better off together, but just couldn’t seem to organise my thoughts well enough to do anything about it.

James spent most of the next day sleeping and being woken for feeds.  We struggled to get James to feed which resulted in us both being pushed, poked, guided and prodded in spite of the hospital’s ‘hands off’ policy in relation to support with breast feeding.  By day three I was exhausted and emotional, and James had started to cry every time I tried to position him for a feed.

I had shared my own one-page profile with as many staff as I could, and virtually every new nurse that came on shift sat down with me and we talked through it together.  A couple of staff used it as an opportunity to basically tell me I knew nothing relative to their extensive experience, but the majority listened attentively and asked clarifying questions.  Heartened by this, I scrawled down James’ first one-page profile while he slept and I should have been resting.

In those early days of fatigue and confusion, writing out James’ profile helped me to make sense of my thoughts and to begin to understand this little person.  At a time when any sense of control was fleeting at best, James’ one-page profile provided a way to assert how we’d prefer to be supported.  I received mixed responses from staff, but I have one particularly positive memory that has stayed with me.

It was around two in the morning and a midwife who was close to my own age sat quietly beside me as I attempted to feed James.  As she read our profiles she related stories about feeding her own three children.  She talked about how each baby was different, each wonderful and puzzling, and each very much their own person from the moment they arrived.  She was encouraging and reassuring, and she provided guidance without any sense of pressure.  She told me that our profiles helped her to know exactly what we needed from her rather than guessing and having the usual feeling as though she’s just not quite getting it right.

An added bonus from writing James’ profile at such an early point has been looking back at it so many months later and remembering details that I am sure I would have forgotten otherwise.

With great support you can achieve great things

A powerful story about one man’s journey from a secure hospital ward to happily living in his own home, using his one-page profile to direct his support and communicate the things that are most important to him.

Michael's one-page profile

Michael’s one-page profile

Written by Tracie Gudgeon of Care UK

When we met Michael he was living on a secure ward with two people supporting him at all times. The people supporting him wore personal attack alarms and were charged with 15 minute observations. This is worlds apart from where he is now. Twenty-nine year old Michael now lives in his own home which he loves people to visit. Not only will he greet visitors with warmth and affection but he will remember how they take their tea and coffee and any other small detail from the last time they were there.

Back when Michael was living on the secure ward a person-centred transitional plan was arranged to see how life could be better for Michael.  It was vital that the people supporting him understood what Michael’s autism looked like for Michael and that they really understood who he was.

We started spending time with Michael in his hospital and worked with him to develop his Circle of Support. A Circle of support is a group of people that come together with the common purpose of helping the person at the centre of the Circle to achieve their goals. We looked into who the important people in Michael’s life were and this in turn led us to learn more about what matters to him.

We started to work alongside his existing support team to help us get to know Michael and would spend time just sitting with him or joining him on his daily routines to understand his world better. Michael started to express himself more during this process and would share with us his aspirations and dreams. We leant that he would like to learn to swim and ride a bike and he shared this with us through pictures.

Michael’s one-page profile captures the confident, fun and outgoing man that he is. With the right support and vision Michael now has his own space and directs his own support. His one-page profile clearly communicates what is important to him and how best to support him so that those people involved in Michael’s life know just how to support him in a way that makes sense.

Michael will think nothing of walking into a room of strangers and socializing with them now and attends a local club night with his friends every Friday – at long last he feels like one of the lads.  Only just recently we saw Michael confidently presenting his thoughts and views to an audience at a regional working together for change event.  The transformation is inspirational.

Michael has now learnt to ride his bike and has twice weekly swimming lessons which are recorded in his one-page profile. He has a busy social calendar, and is an active advocate at our Care UK Listen to me Group. Michael’s support is directed by his one-page profile and his story is evidence that with great support you can achieve great things.

Can one-page profiles work in mental health?

Written by Sarah Carr, independent Mental Health and Social Care knowledge Consultant www.sarahcarrassocs.co.uk

Sarah carr

Sarah Carr

When I wrote my one-page profile I was thinking specifically about mental health and prevention. I reflected on what helps and hinders me and what makes me feel safe. I think my profile is a very effective tool for self-management – sometimes I lose sight of what can affect me! Because I had complete control over what is in the profile, I represented myself in a way that is true to me – I didn’t have to use a diagnosis, explain my history or fit into a category. I communicated who I am and what I need without having to label myself. In this way profiles can help with overcoming the stigma associated with psychiatric diagnosis and can challenge self-stigma. Like many people with mental health problems, I have a negative view of myself and fairly low self-worth. Here, I was especially challenged by the part where I had to think about what people appreciate and value in me, my gifts and my strengths. Although it was a hard exercise, for me it was a form of therapy. Finding good things about yourself and committing them to writing as part of a profile to be shared so you can be understood fully can be a powerful exercise for someone with low self-worth or internalised stigma. At the moment I’m using my profile to remain aware of what keeps me safe and well (and to remind me of what people value in me!) but if I should experience a crisis again I would use the profile to communicate with mental health practitioners and as a way to aid my recovery – that is recovering my life and self.

As an independent mental health and social care knowledge consultant, my lived experience of mental distress and service-use informs my work. I really wanted to join the conversation about one-page profiles on this blog site because I believe they have the potential to address many of the difficulties that people who experience mental distress or use mental health services often encounter.

One-page profiles in a mental health crisis

If someone is using mental health services a one-page profile can be a powerful way to communicate and maintain their personhood in what can often be a dehumanising, medicalised system. For someone who finds themselves in crisis and is admitted into hospital, a profile can be a very effective way of communicating who they are and what good support looks like at a time when they might not have the capacity or opportunity to do so in any other way. Many people who have been patients in psychiatric hospitals say that they felt reduced to their symptoms or diagnosis and weren’t understood as whole people with interests, strengths, talents and preferences. We now know how detrimental this can be and clinical guidelines are in place to emphasise the person-centred, human elements of mental health support such as empathy, optimism, dignity, respect, support for self-management, emotional support, being known and having appropriate activities. A one-page profile, written by the person when they feel well, with support if needed, can be an effective way to support continuity of understanding about an individual in changing circumstances and fluctuating mental health. They could be used alongside more formal Advance Directives, which are designed so the individual gets a say over treatment and other practical decisions should they become too unwell to make decisions themselves.

In the workplace

Many workers and workplaces struggle with understanding how to recognise and address the stress that can lead to new mental health problems or a relapse of existing ones. Employers may find workplace accessibility and reasonable adjustments difficult to understand for mental health. Stigma continues to be very a difficult issue for people with mental health problems who are job seeking or in employment. But as in mental health services, the solutions are often rooted in simple things like communication and being understood as an individual. Both these aspects are addressed in a one-page profile which could help facilitate a person with a mental health problem to self-manage at work and help their manager or colleagues to be supportive in practical ways. If an individual is having problems with workplace stress or is recovering from an episode of mental distress, the ‘how to support me’ part of the one-page profile can help with implementing reasonable adjustments and ensuring accessibility. Mental health stigma can be reduced and crisis prevention promoted in the workplace if every employee has a one-page profile, designed to communicate individual strengths, preferences and needs to line managers and HR personnel.

To summarise, I think that if used well, in mental health services profiles could significantly improve the experience of users and if applied in the workplace, this simple approach could make it a much safer and more accessible place. In both cases, it’s about being known as a person and being able to communicate what’s important to you, which can help with prevention and self-management as well as getting through a crisis period.

‘My story’ – Having control in life and in death

Michael created his one-page profile to help him move from an NHS mental health facility into supported living and to help the people around him understand him as a person and not just his schizoaffective disorder.  This story shows how Michael’s one-page profile transcended its first purpose and helped to support him at the end of his life, enabling him to leave behind ‘his story’ in the way that he wanted it to be told.

Written by Nicola Thompson’s (Michael’s nurse)

Michael's one-page profile

Michael’s one-page profile

Sixty-two year old Michael is described as a man’s man, with great strength of character, someone who has pushed through many difficulties in his life, an inspiration to others and someone who never gives up. Michael was a schoolteacher for many years but resigned due to problems with his mental health. Towards the end of his life he lived in a community mental health rehabilitation scheme in Manchester.

Michael had a diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder and his physical health had slowly deteriorated as he had stage three kidney failure and excessive oedema in both his legs. Sadly Michael died within months of producing his one-page profile which then supported him and his family in his passing.

Michael created his one-page profile with the help of his key nurse so that when he attended appointments where people didn’t know him they would have a better understanding of who he was as a person rather than as a patient.  Michael was also being supported to move into sheltered accommodation and it was felt that the profile could travel with him and that important information to him would not be lost within his move.

It took Michael approximately two months to create his profile because his condition meant that he had prolonged periods where he was either too unwell or unable to work on it.  Together with his key nurse, Michael worked through the person centred thinking tools including relationship map, good day/ bad day, important to/for, communication chart and his formal NHS assessments such as the MANCAS.  The sessions always took place at his home as this is where he felt most comfortable. He also produced a story to accompany his one-page profile and his wish was that he could leave a copy for his grandchildren after he passed away as they were both too young to understand his illness and subsequent death. It was important to him that they knew what he was really like as a person.

When Michael started his journey no one knew that his one-page profile would be used to support him at the end of his life and that it would help him to communicate about his physical health as well as his mental health. In the weeks before his death it meant that the people supporting him had a greater understanding of why Michael behaved in certain ways.  It helped reduced frustration for both Michael and his support team and meant everyone was more patient with each other. Michael and others were finally able to accept things the way they were, rather than questioning them. Importantly, it enabled Michael to have better control over his life without having to continually explain the reasoning behind some of his more unusual behavior.

Michael was able to take his story and profile to hospital when he became very unwell.  Again it helped the nursing staff see Michael as a person and not just a patient.  The team was able to use the profile to see what was important to Michael and what was important for him, allowing for better communication and understanding.

Michael was a proud father and grandfather. His wife had passed away ten years earlier and this was still the source of much upset for him. Being able to express himself to his family and to leave behind a story and one-page profile that would help others feel more connected to him would have made Michael very happy – as would knowing that his story lives on and that you are reading it now.

Getting back on your feet

An example of how this 85 year-old used a one-page profile to help direct all the new support she was receiving in her life following a fall and a short hospital stay. Mary lives at home and had lost her confidence after her accident. Her one-page profile has helped her get back on her feet.

Written by Gill Bailey

Mary's one-page profile

Mary’s one-page profile

Mary is 85 years old, she lives in Preston in a house she owns and she has lived there for around 50 years. She has raised her children there and has fond memories connected to her home and would not like to move anywhere else. Mary’s husband George sadly passed away seven years ago. Since then Mary has been living on her own. Mary has always been independent and says she has been brought up not to expect any help from anyone and to “get on with it”.

Mary has devoted her life to raising her two children: daughter Diane and son John who both have their own families now. They live in Preston and visit Mary on a regular basis. Mary cherishes her time with her children and grandchildren and is delighted when they come to visit. They also often take her for a meal out.

Following a fall caused by an uneven pathway whilst out shopping, Mary was taken to hospital in an ambulance she was thoroughly checked over. Although nothing was fractured she was badly bruised and had lost her confidence in going out, as she was scared of falling again. It was clear Mary would need ongoing support from domiciliary care services and so Alex (a reablement team member responsible for supporting Mary back to living life as she chose) met with her and her family to develop a one-page profile.

The aim was to use the one-page profile with the various people and teams that would be involved in Mary’s ongoing care. It would provide a concise account of what Mary truly wanted and how they could support her best. A lot of rich information came out of the conversations with Mary and her family and this was used to inform her profile, which Mary ultimately wrote herself. We learned that Mary goes to bingo weekly on Mondays and to a lunching club at the local community centre on Thursdays which she thoroughly enjoyed and clearly wanted to continue.

We also uncovered that Mary doesn’t always remember to take her medication and she keeps it on the kitchen table so she remembers to take her tablets after breakfast. It was really important to Mary that she managed her own medication and she didn’t wish for staff to support her with this although she was happy for supporters to ask how she is getting in with her system.

Since the fall Mary uses a walking stick and feels safer and steadier with it than without. Mary is now confident enough to keep to her bingo and lunching club commitments, and considers herself to be “back to normal”.

Mary says that her profile really helps people get to know her quickly and means she isn’t having to tell staff over and over what she needs because the one-page profile does this for her. It means that staff can ensure she has what matters present on a day to day basis and that she is consistently supported regardless of the number of different people involved in providing that support.

One-page profiles during long hospital stays

Several years ago Shelley Dumas was involved in a terrible car accident.  She was very seriously injured and used a one-page profile during her long hospital stay.

 Written by Shelley Dumas

Shelley Dumas YouTube Video

Shelley Dumas YouTube Video

Laura Buckner developed a one-page profile for me during my 5 month rehabilitation hospital stay after an automobile accident.  The focus of this  was supporting me in the hospital environment, including what people liked and admired about me and what was important to me at this time.  Laura asked several friends to send their thoughts about what they liked and admired about me (really lifting my spirits).  Then she spent time with me, asking what was important to me and how staff and visitors could support me during my hospital stay.

I observed doctors, nurses, technicians, therapists, aides and visitors stopping to read the large (11×17) laminated purple profile posted in two places in my room.  They were hard to miss.  I began to notice a difference in these people’s perceptions of me and they began to talk to me about the information in the profile.

One doctor said, “this should be in everyone’s room.”  A registered nurse and professor at the local university nursing school asked for a copy so that she could include it in her courses. Everyone would stand, read and re-read it when they came in or left my room.

It was working!  One of the ways it helped me was by communicating to everyone how important it was to me to have all my necessary items in reach. I had learned very early that I must have my cell phone, nurse’s call button, TV remote control, and my bed tray close by. These items were my security system and kept me in positive control of my life while I was there. Because of my one-page profile, people visiting me and staff would always check that they were in place before leaving my room.

All of the professionals began to know me as someone other than their typical patients and I developed several relationships that have remained in place even three years later.  The importance of having the one-page profile posted in my hospital room was unbelievably helpful during one of the most stressful times in my life.

You can watch a Youtube video of Shelley talking about her hospital experience here.

Not just someone lying in bed 2B

An inspirational example of how one-page profiles can help people in hospital connect with others during confusing and difficult times. Kris had no idea of the impact her mum’s one-page profile would have, not just for them, but for the medical staff, other patients and their loved ones.

A photo of Laurine's one-page profile on the wall in  the hospital

A photo of Laurine’s one-page profile on the wall in the hospital

Written by Kris, a person-centred thinking trainer

Meet my mother, Laurine Kaiser. She has been married to my father for soon to be 63 years. They have three children, myself (Kris) being the middle child in addition to my older brother Stephen and my younger sister Kimberly. Mom was born in 1927 and will be celebrating her 86th birthday in November this year. She has always enjoyed an active life as a Mom, wife, travel companion, pharmacist, bridge player, friend and sister to a younger sister and brother who live in Kitchener.

My Mom and Dad moved in to my home in 2010 shortly after my husband passed away. We spent a few months together before my Mom fell ill for the first time in her life. She ended up at St. Joseph’s hospital in Hamilton where she remained a patient for five months. The doctors had quite a challenge for some time trying to figure out exactly what was wrong with her. She eventually ended up in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and spent almost two weeks there before she graduated to the Progressive Care Unit.

At that time my Mom was not able to use words and was extremely tired from the long journey she’d been on in the ICU. On several occasions nurses, doctors, therapists etc. would enter the room and ask me questions about my Mom…did she ever work, what line of work, is she married, how many grandchildren etc. That was when I decided to create a one-page profile for my Mom. Looking at this frail yet dignified and elegant woman lying there so peacefully yet so helpless I knew that I needed to do something so that people could connect with my Mom by looking and reading her profile. It was a way to humanize my Mom and value her as a person with a story to tell and not just someone lying in bed 2B.

I was excited to complete this one-page profile for her, knowing that this would make a positive difference in her life. I created the profile in one night with a dollar store bristle board, a black magic marker and a few photos of her along with the joys in her life.

When I returned to the hospital the next day I couldn’t wait to put it up! My Mom was thrilled with it and stared at it for hours. She would smile and point to people making kind gestures. The nurse came in the room that afternoon and read the board and quickly pointed out that my Mom’s favourite TV show was Big Bang Theory which was also hers. She remarked, “I’ll put it on the TV for her tonight at 7:30. Mom gave her the biggest smile.

Word seemed to get around the floor and the hospital about my Mom’s one-page profile and soon other patients’ families and friends on the floor were asking to see it, vowing to create one for their loved one. It just seemed to snowball with positive remarks from all. Close to the end of my Mom’s extended stay at St. Joseph’s the administration team came to have a look at the profile and said that they should introduce this in their hospital. That was a great day!!

Doing the one-page profile for my Mom made such a difference in her mental and physical recovery. Having this tool created a way for others to have a conversation with Mom and it also provided information about her interests and hobbies which often was a source of some great chats with people she met at St. Joe’s.

I’ve always known that the one-page profile works however I didn’t know the impact it would have on so many people and their loved ones.