Healthier, happier and in control – with a one-page profile

When Paul’s support team realised that he didn’t have a one-page profile they knew they needed to create one with him straight away. Paul owns his own home and is supported to live the life he chooses. His profile contains some very specific information about how to support him well, crucial to his ongoing health and wellbeing.

Paul's one-page profile

Paul’s one-page profile

Written by Tracey Gudgeon, Care UK

Paul is a gentleman who lives by the sea in North Wales. He owns his own home which he bought after his parents passed away. Paul is a fabulous artist and the other love of his life is his religion.

Previously Paul lived at home with his mum and dad and has been supported since buying his own home.

It was summer time and Paul was due to review his service again. He’s already had a Person-centred review so knew what it entailed and was looking forward to it. On the day of his review though, Paul decided it was far too nice a day to sit around  and he changed his mind about what he was going to do that day. He made up a picnic and went off on a long walk up the Orm, which is one of his favourite places and takes him past his old family home.

Paul told his team manager that he was happy for his team to spend time thinking from their perspective about what was working and not working and it was whilst doing this it was noticed that Paul did not have a one-page profile.

A one-page profile captures the important information about a person on one sheet of paper. It celebrates their gifts and talents as well as highlights what is important to them and how best to support them. It was considered essential that Paul should have one so his team set about working with him to create one at the earliest opportunity.

Paul’s one-page profile does have very detailed information around what is good support in relation to his cigarettes which play a big part in his daily routines. Paul’s world can revolve around when he is having his next cigarette and although he wants to cut down, he finds it hard to do so, just like so many other people.

The one-page profile supported Paul’s team to do their job better and have a clearer understanding of just exactly what was important in Paul’s life.

Having the one-page profile highlighted the need for better consistency with the staff rota , and helping Paul know just who was coming on to support him . This helped with Paul’s anxieties which in turn meant he didn’t feel the need to smoke as much.

The other benefits from completing a one-page profile has been that Paul has been able to feel healthier and lost some weight (which certainly helps when walking along the sea front or up the Orm). This has again been due to information highlighted around the need for good support with menu planning , budgets and shopping.

Capturing the past, present and future in a one-page profile

A powerful example of how a one-page profile has helped this man reconnect with his passions, improve his relationships and his communication. Ray’s family had become concerned about his health and wellbeing and after he was admitted to hospital, they asked for help to support him well.

Ray's one-page profile

Ray’s one-page profile

Written by Gill Bailey

Eighty year old Ray is full of life and enjoys the company of others. He is a jovial character and loves telling stories about his life experiences. Ray has lived in his first floor flat in Burnley for about 41 years.

When Ray was younger, he had lots of jobs such as working on the railways as a signal man and a train driver. Ray went into the Army for a time with the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment and travelled all over the world. He went to Normandy and takes great pride in this.

Ray has always been a very active and sociable man. He has lots of hobbies like collecting books, reading, music of all types and going to the Miners Club where his friend Harry used to take him every third Wednesday to meet up with all the ex-soldiers. They would have a few drinks and then Harry used to bring him home.

Over the last few years however it has become apparent that Ray has not been managing as well as he used to do at home. People were not visiting him as regularly and his home was becoming difficult to move around because he had taken to collecting and storing boxes of papers, books and magazines.

He was beginning to become socially isolated and wasn’t going out as often as he used to. He was not taking care of himself and his health was deteriorating both physically and mentally.

Ray’s family and friends became concerned that he wasn’t coping well, and needed some help to “get him back on his feet.” It was when Ray was admitted to Hospital due to poor mobility, confusion and water retention that a home person-centred review was arranged.  Ray, his son and daughter-in-law, his best friend Harry and support staff were all involved in the review. The aim was to bring together those people who knew Ray best and who could help him get his life back on track.

By developing a one-page profile we were able to capture the things that are important to Ray and more of the things that matter to him and that he wants to be in his life. This has helped in creating activities for Ray and plans to make his life better and more enjoyable and worth while.

It has given his family, friends and those close to him some ideas and plans on how to best support Ray and to identify the things that worked well for him.

During the review lots of very rich nuggets of information about what people knew about Ray and what mattered to him came to light. His past, present and his future were also discussed

Big changes have resulted from the review and the one-page profile. We recognised the need to do more work using communications charts and relationships maps to help Ray in these areas. We also identified the problems he was having in his home, keeping on top of cooking and cleaning and how his difficulty getting out had left him feeling lonely.

Ray has since moved into a sheltered housing scheme in Burnley. There are activities daily in the complex that Ray can get involved in and they have a book club in which they are looking at appointing a new member for the committee. They also have a local cookery class that is being run by the Volunteer Services who collect the group twice weekly and they go to the local community centre and regain confidence, motivation and skills in and around the kitchen so Ray can go back to his own flat in the complex and prepare meals for himself.

The complex provides lunch and evening meals daily, so Ray gets to go and mix with others and tell them his stories. Ray has a key worker who has been matched to him using his one-page profile and they have started visiting the Miners Club again every third Thursday and Harry meets them there for a drink.

Ray is much more relaxed, less frustrated and his life now has more meaning and purpose. He feels valued and he now offers others support. Ray is much more settled and appears happier in himself, smiling. laughing and joking with his new and old friends.

 

 

 

Helping Kenny reconnect with his past

A powerful example of how one-page profiles can help people living with dementia share what is important to them and how best to support them. Kenny wasn’t using speech to communicate anymore and his mobility had suffered after a fall. His family and support team needed to share what they knew about Kenny and his history with each other to help him communicate better and have more choice and control.

Written by Gill Bailey

Kenny picThe company of his wife and mother, chocolate, magazines, newspapers, tea with two sugars and long bubble baths; these are the things that are important to Kenny. The people who support Kenny know this straight away even if it’s the first time they have met him. How? Because it is written on his one-page profile.

Kenny is 64-years-old and is one of the warmest people you could wish to meet. He has lived in a home which supports people with dementia for five years.

As a young man, Kenny was a professional football player. Aged 25, he went into the textile trade as a salesman until retiring due to early onset dementia at 54–years-old. Kenny loved sport and played every sport going.  His mum Ethel said: “if sport had been his exams, he would have been top of the tree in them all!”

He loved golfing holidays with his mates and he also spent many happy weekends away with his wife Jean in their caravan, which was his pride and joy. Kenny and Jean didn’t have any children but, as Jean said;”we were always content to just have each other and our group of friends.”

Kenny was a very confident man who could go and chat with a roomful of strangers easily. He enjoyed socialising with friends, and a drink in his local most days on his way home from work.

As Kenny’s illness progressed it became clear to those close to Kenny that he was bored and restless.  Kenny no longer used any words to speak and was unable to move around unless supported by two staff members or in a wheelchair due to a fall which led to a broken hip a year previously. A person-centred review meeting was arranged with Kenny, his wife Jean, his mum Ethel. I was the facilitator and we brought in the support staff who knew him best, including Adrian the nurse who had specialised in dementia care.  Prior to the review, they carried out a functional assessment to establish a broad brush view of the stage of dementia Kenny was at, which at best could be helpful in creating activity which would increase Kenny’s well-being and ensure he had the things that mattered to him present in his life.  At least it would give those close to him ideas to try in order to learn what worked well for Kenny.

At Kenny’s review meeting, everyone gathered their collective learning about what was important to him, what best support looked like from his perspective, any questions to answer or issues to resolve; and what was Working and Not Working from the perspective of Kenny, his family and the staff team. This was a process which helped everyone think about Kenny’ life with him.  Its purpose was to inform action that made life better for Kenny and his allies. Those who knew Kenny well recognised what he was saying with his behaviours and so they began to record that rich information onto communication charts. This would be added to by everyone who spent time with Kenny as they learnt new information. They also explored how they could provide opportunities for Kenny to try new things to help them learn more about what would make life better for him.

The most significant outcome from the meeting was the development of Kenny’s one-page profile which would prove invaluable to staff as they used it as their job description (how best to support Kenny) on a day to day basis. It meant that even new staff could get to know Kenny quickly and support him in ways that made sense to him. Having the things that were important to Kenny written down on one sheet of paper made a massive difference. Knowing the important people in his life, how he takes his tea, what treats he likes, what calms him down and what works him up enabled the team to support Kenny well.

As well as capturing this vital information, the great in-depth conversations that occurred between Kenny’s family and support workers when creating the one-page profile meant that they were able to share history and personal knowledge that could be used by each other to help Kenny feel more in touch with his past and reconnect with familiar times.

Life is much more interesting for Kenny these days – evidenced by the spark in his eyes and frequent smile on his face – a rarity before staff explored these approaches with him. His support worker Jane described it as a “transformation…’’ and it isn’t just Kenny’s life that changed so positively. The people who care about Kenny now have the confidence that people understand him well and appreciate him for his personal talents and gifts.

You can use conversation cards to ask good questions that draw out rich information, when supporting someone with dementia and their family to create a one-page profile.