Is this care you would be happy with?

It started with a person-centred thinking course attended by Sue, the care home manager and now Sam, the people he lives with and the people who support them are on a life-changing journey. An example of how this man’s one-page profile has led to him reigniting old relationships and hobbies; making him feel like he has a purpose again. 

Sam's one-page profile

Sam’s one-page profile

Written by Gill Bailey

Sam is 78 and lives in a residential care home supporting older people on the Fylde Coast.

The manager, Sue, went on a person-centred thinking course and decided that things in the care home should and could change. She knew this required a huge shift in culture. This shift began with uniforms no-longer being worn, to create a more ‘family feel’ and a no ‘them and us’ culture. Toilets became communal – so there were no separate staff toilets, no staff mugs and sitting and eating with people who lived there became the way things were done.

Sue’s enthusiasm was contagious and the majority of the staff team are now competent in using the person-centred thinking tools. Each member of staff was taken off rota for two hours and asked to simply sit in the lounge in order to feel, hear and see the ‘lived experience’ of the people they supported. They were then asked “is this care you would be happy with?” The resounding answer was ‘no’ and so the desire for real change began in earnest.

They began to develop one-page profiles with everyone who lived in the home and staff developed their own which included their hobbies and interests . Sam who lives in the home developed his one-page profile with help from Sue.

The main thing that wasn’t working for Sam was that his friendships had all been lost after spending three months in hospital and then coming to live in the home four years earlier. Sam particularly missed his connection with the crown green bowling club he had belonged to for a number of years – he had lost all contact with his old mates.

Sam was supported to write to some of his old friends and as they responded, he gained the confidence to think about how he could reconnect with the bowling club, which wasn’t far away from the home. There was a spring in Sam’s step as he anticipated the possibilities.

The challenge now was finding the right staff member to support Sam to go and watch the bowling. Sue found that Greg, a new member of staff, looked the perfect match for Sam, as he too was a keen bowler. Sam agreed. Within a month, they went off to the bowling club together. Sam cannot bowl because of his hip injury but enjoyed catching up with his old friends, while Greg would play a few games. After a couple of months, it was as though Sam had never been away. Greg and Sam went once a fortnight.

Sam now writes the monthly newsletter for the bowling club. Prior to retiring, Sam was a keen writer and produced the church newsletter each week, so he feels that he is giving something back.

Sam’s life feels very different now and as he said recently, “I’ve got something to get up for, meeting the lads and I’m working on a newsletter”. This all began by listening well to Sam and developing his one-page profile with him. The information it captures is used by all those involved in Sam’s support to ensure that he is living life the way he chooses.

Read more about personalisation and dementia including blogs, resources and related media articles at www.personalisationanddementia.wordpress.com

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